CMN Weekly (21 May 2021)

Some of the best links we picked up around the internet

By: Karen O'Hanlon Cohrt - May. 21, 2021

Top picks

Industry

Research

  • Researchers at Brown University, US, use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to correct a pathogenic mutation in iPSCs derived from a patient with the X-linked neurogenetic disorder Christianson syndrome. The findings were shared on the preprint server BioRxiv.
  • A team of researchers in Korea has developed a method called spCas9-assisted true variant labeling sequencing (CARVE-seq), which detects low-frequency mutant alleles with high accuracy. The tool deploys target base-specific cleavage by Cas9 and its accuracy was verified on ten reoccuring single nucleotide variants in human tumours. The findings were published earlier this week.
  • Researchers at University of Illinois, US, have developed a new CRISPR controller in which a chemically inducible anti-CRISPR protein AcrIIA4 is engineered to prevent Cas9 from binding to DNA upon the addition of the FDA-approved ligand trimethoprim. The team could show dose-dependant control over CRISPR off-target editing in mammalian cells. The results were published this week.
  • Researchers in China have installed CRISPR-Cas12a sensors into a portable glucose meter for point-of-care detection of analytes. In the system, the presence of the target analye induces activation of the collateral cleavage activity of Cas12a. The findings were published in Analyst today.
  • A transformer base-editing (tBE) system has been developed that induces efficient editing with only background levels of genome-wide and transcriptome-wide off-target mutations. The new system was developed using a cleavable deoxycytidine deaminase inhibitor (dCDI) domain that is cleaved following binding at target sites. The system was validated following adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery and PCSK9 targeting in mice. The results are published in Nature Cell Biology.
  • Metagenomics analysis from hypersaline environmental samples identified Cas13X and Cas13Y, two compact families of CRISPR-Cas ribonucleases with demonstrated RNA-interfering or RNA-editing activity in mammalian cell lines. The findings, published in Nature Methods earlier this week, suggst the presence of untapped bacterial defense systems in natural microbes that may have potential for RNA-editing applications.

COVID-19

Webinars and interviews

  • Don't forget the upcoming CRISPR Medicine News webinar on May 26th. Our speakers will discuss the important subject of CRISPR Delivery Systems. Find out more and sign up to attend here.
  • Gene Therapy at a Crossroads: The Challenges and Opportunities Ahead. Free on-demand webinar sponsored by Catalent, featuring panelists from Beam Therapeutics and CRISPR Therapeutics. Get access here.
  • CRISPR Therapeutics CEO Dr. Samarth Kulkarni joined leaders at the Fifth International Vatican Conference to discuss the promise of CRISPR-based treatments to transform medicine. Watch the recorded interview here.

Review and analysis

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